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Posted by on Feb 15, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

How To Treat Dehydration Symptoms

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Overview

  • A kid can become dehydrated either because they lost a lot of bodily fluids or because they aren’t consuming sufficient liquids.
  • If dehydration goes on for an extensive period of time or is extremely bad, it can be a serious. Your child may need medical evaluation and treatment.

Causes of Dehydration

If dehydration goes on for an extensive period of time or is extremely bad, it can be a serious.

If dehydration goes on for an extensive period of time or is extremely bad, it can be a serious.

  • Gastroenteritis is the most widespread reason for dehydration as it can make your kid lose a lot of fluids rapidly.
  • Any disorder where there’s constant diarrhoea, nausea or reduced fluid consumption, can cause dehydration.
  • If your child is reluctant to consume liquids for any reason, they could also become dehydrated.
  • Extreme sweating can also cause dehydration, mainly in babies in very humid weather, or in teenage kids who are doing vigorous action.

Symptoms of Dehydration

A young child who’s dehydrated will urinate less frequently.

Your child:

  • Will appear thin and pale
  • Will often be exhausted and tired
  • May have less tears due to lack of fluids
  • May be parched.

Furthermore, your child’s:

  • Eyes may look drawn and gloomy
  • Mouth and tongue will be encrusted and dry.

Visiting your GP

See your GP if:

  • Nausea and diarrhoea continues
  • You’re concerned.

Treatment of Dehydration

  • You can manage milder cases of dehydration by providing your child with more water.
  • Liquids have to be given in tiny amounts, but regularly.
  • In more serious cases, your child may need hospital support to help them rebuild their loss of fluids.
  • In a lot of cases, the most secure and quickest way to do this is by placing a tiny tube into the nose and then through to the tummy, through which re-hydrating liquids can be provided.
  • Sometimes, liquids must be given intravenously (straight into the vein). This means your kid will have to go into hospital.

Related Video On Dehydration

 

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The information posted on this page is for educational purposes only.
If you need medical advice or help with a diagnosis contact a medical professional

  • All firstaidtrainers.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.

  • All firstaidtrainers.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.